strangefamilia

Struggle from Bart

Posted in arts mix by strangefamilia on November 29, 2009

Struggle.

 

 

un petit text pour joseph

close up test 003

Posted in Uncategorized by strangefamilia on November 8, 2009

img 0067

ONE MORE !

Posted in Uncategorized by strangefamilia on November 8, 2009

 

A short film produced, directed, photographed and edited by Ben Philippi and Barthelemy Glumineau starring the talented Mr. William Bonnet. Music by The Roots.

SOME RECENT EDITS

Posted in Uncategorized by strangefamilia on November 8, 2009

 

A short film produced, directed, photographed and edited by Ben Philippi and Barthelemy Glumineau. Starring the talented Mr. Eric Bates.

flying

Posted in arts mix by strangefamilia on June 9, 2009

Escape Artist by Sam Taylor-Wood

shadow

Posted in arts mix by strangefamilia on June 9, 2009

Shadow Hands by Russ and ReynShadow Hands by Russ and Reyn

few links, selective isolation, hermes, and car crashes

Posted in arts mix by strangefamilia on June 9, 2009

Tim Walker for HermèsSelective Insulation by Davidson RafailidisSelective Insulation by Davidson RafailidisSelective Insulation by Davidson RafailidisCar Crash Studies by Nicolai HowaltCar Crash Studies by Nicolai Howalt

underwater

Posted in arts mix by strangefamilia on April 14, 2009

reviewjournal wrote about republic of dreams

Posted in Uncategorized by strangefamilia on April 13, 2009

‘Republic of Dreams’ vague, but spellbinding

You don’t have to know a thing about Bruno Schultz to have a great time at “Republic of Dreams.”

Barthelemy Glumineau — a French clown currently in the Cirque du Soleil production of “Love” at The Mirage — has put together a smoky, brooding, sometimes funny and always touching one-man pantomime inspired by the Polish author’s writings. (He died at the age of 52 at the hands of the Nazis.) Glumineau makes no attempt to give information about Schultz. He just creates a character who experiences similar existential dilemmas in trying to construct a comfortable life.

The performer/director/writer keeps things vague. We’re in what looks like an attic of some type, with an arbitrary selection of ordinary objects: a wooden table, a chair, blankets, a stagecoach wheel, a butcher knife, a mold of clay, a series of mobiles, a small, cathedral-like window. For the next 45 minutes or so, Glumineau does battle with the objects, and wins and loses in unexpected ways. In a curious development, a door opens and a beautifully pure light beckons him. He smiles contentedly and you think he’s going to walk into peace. Instead, he turns away from his “salvation” and continues his sufferings in the room.

The script has a Beckett feel, and is similar in set-up to “Act Without Words.” But it’s much more surprising than you’d expect, and not as dramatically pact. Glumineau’s movements, style and sense of character are superb, but you’re also mesmerized by the play’s events. You want to make sense of the breathtaking impressions. Glumineau is hesitant offstage to offer much about the meaning of his play, but it’s safe to say that at the very least it’s about a man who learns to deal, in uncomfortable ways, with life’s realities.

The action is frequently enhanced by traditional Catholic hymnals, and the lights (by Eugen Brim) give the atmosphere a pictorial, somber mood, that I took as an homage to Schultz’s secondary career as a painter.

I think the show could gain by a slightly clearer dramatic structure (Cirque performers seem to loathe structure), and a longer playing time, or at least a companion piece to flesh out the evening. But Glumineau’s production is, as is, spellbinding. It’s another exciting chapter in the strengthening union between Strip and community.


Weekly Vegas wrote about republic of dreams

Posted in arts mix by strangefamilia on April 13, 2009

Our Picks of the Week

Watch a frenzied Frenchman. We just saw the previews for The Republic of Dreams, the mostly wordless, one-man show at the Onyx Theatre by Barthelemy Glumineau, one of the clowns in the Cirque du Soleil production of Love. We’re not even going to try to explain what it’s about, except maybe to pepper you with words from the artist and the theater’s manager: “environmental,” “atmospheric” and “physical.” We can also tell you that Glumineau artfully hacks away at a lump of clay with a butcher knife, throws himself to the floor repeatedly, heaves and cries and snorts and pounds his fists and pulsates under a muslin sheet for an hour. Glumineau explained: “It’s about fighting to exit a dream, a man still in his sleep, struggling for life.” Act fast: Only 60 seats will be sold to preserve the delicate vibe.
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